Tropical Storm Bret 2017: Firsts or Firsts in a Long Time

9 07 2017

Dale C. S. Destin |

Tropical Storm Bret making landfall on Trinidad during the early morning hours of June 20, 2017.

Tropical Storm Bret making landfall on Trinidad during the early morning hours of June 20, 2017.

The formation of Tropical Storm Bret, a few weeks ago, resulted in several firsts or firsts in a long time for the Atlantic hurricane season, for the Eastern Caribbean and for Trinidad. Here are some we have noted:

  • 1st named storm to pass south of La Brea, Trinidad.
  • 1st named storm to form between Africa and the Caribbean before summer (June 21).
  • 1st time there were two named storms (Bret and Cindy) in June alive at the same time – June 20, 2017.
  • 1st designated potential tropical cyclone ever by the U.S. National Hurricane Center.
  • 1st named storm to impact the Eastern Caribbean before summer, since an unnamed hurricane in March 1908 impacted Antigua and the northeast Caribbean – the only other such system to impact the area before June 21; it formed in the Caribbean Sea.
  • 1st named storm to impact Trinidad in June since an unnamed hurricane in 1933. There is no other June storm on record for Trinidad.
All named storm on record for June - 1851 to 2016

All named storm on record for June – 1851 to 2016. Only three storms have affected the Eastern Caribbean in June since 1851. Two seen above plus Bret.

  • 1st named storm to form between African and the Caribbean in June since Tropical Storm Anna of 1979. There has ONLY been one other in June – an unnamed hurricane of 1933. So, there have ONLY been three named storms to impact the Eastern Caribbean in June on record.
  • 1st named storm to make landfall (pass over land) in Trinidad since Tropical Storm Bret of 1993. This has ONLY happened three other times – Fran of 1990, Alma of 1974 and an unnamed storm of 1933.
  • 1st named storm to pass within 65 nuatical miles (nm) or 120 km of Port of Spain, Trinidad, since Joyce of 2000. There have ONLY been 11 named storms in history, dating back to 1851, to have passed within 65 nm of Port of Spain, Trinidad; ONLY four were hurricanes, the last one being Hurricane Flora of 1963.
All named storms to have passed within 65 nm of Port of Spain, Trinidad on Record - 1851 to 2016

All named storms to have passed within 65 nm of Port of Spain, Trinidad on Record – 1851 to 2016

  • 1st time two named storms (Bret and Cindy) formed in June since 1909. It has happened ONLY two other times – 1906 and 1886. Both 1906 and 1886 turned out to be very active years; 1909 had near normal activity.
  • 1st named storm in June since Barry of 2013.

This June was quite active, in terms of named storms. The average for the month is 0.5 or one every other year. So, the two named storms which formed in this past June amount to the total we normally get in four Junes.

Is the activity of June an omen for the rest of the season? Well, the sample  size – three, is way too small to so say anything remotely definitive; however, FYI, of the three Junes with two named storms, two were quite active. Further, of the 10 seasons with at least 3 named storms forming between January 1 and June 30, six have been near or below normal.

All named storms for Jan-Jun 1851 to 2016

All Jan-Jun named storms on record, 1851 to 2016

Our most recent forecast of the season calls for above normal activity with 16 named storms, 7 becoming hurricanes and 4 becoming major hurricanes.

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Our Inaugural Forecast of the Atlantic Hurricane Season

5 07 2017

Dale C. S. Destin |

We have just released our first inhouse-produced forecast of the Atlantic hurricane season. It calls for an above normal season with 16 named storms, 7 becoming hurricanes and 4 reaching major hurricane status.

The main reasons for the above normal forecast are the warmer than usual tropical North Atlantic and the unlikely development of an El Nino. This season could turn our similar to last year’s and be one of the most active since 2010.

We hope that you find this forecast to be a useful resource in your hurricane season preparations. Please feel free to share you feedback with us as usual.  Click here for the full forecast.

Become hurricane strong!

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