The Fourth Longest Sub-Twenty Cold Spell for Antigua and Barbuda

23 01 2017

Dale C. S. Destin |

Last night’s cold weather makes the current sub-twenty °C (sub 70 °F) cold spell the fourth longest on record at the Airport and most of the rest of Antigua and Barbuda. It tied with February and December of 1973.

With a mean minimum temperature of 18.6 °C (65.5 °F), it is also the second coldest sub-twenty cold spell for the country, on record, lasting more than three consecutive nights. The mean minimum temperature for the past four nights ranged between 11 and 22 °C (71.6 °F) with the vast majority of places experiencing sub-twenty temperatures.

jan2017coldspelltemps

The last time the Airport had a temperature below 18 C was in 2000 – 16 years ago.

We are also looking at the coldest four-night period for January since 1980 – over 35 years ago, and since 2000 for all other months, at least, at the Airport.

Of the eight times we have seen this spell lasting more than three days, it has gone for four days twice and five days thrice, based on data for the Airport.

The record five-day sub-twenty cold spell is shared by March 1997, January 1984 and March 1972. The coldest one is March 1972 with a mean minimum temperature of 18.5 °C (65.3 °F).

So far for January, the mean minimum temperature at the Airport is now 21.9 °C (71.4 °F) – below normal. The mean daily temperature is well below normal with a value of 24.6 °C (76.3 °F).

There is now about a 50/50 chance the record will be tied tonight, as conditions could favour sub-twenty temperatures once again. If it were to happen, this cold spell would likely become the longest as the chances of sub-twenty temperatures are high for Tuesday and Wednesday nights. Usual January temperatures are expected after Wednesday.

The statements above are truest for the Airport and surrounding areas; however, from a qualitative assessment, it is applicable to the rest of the country.

Follow us for all you need to know about this cold spell and all things weather and climate. We can be followed on twitterfacebookinstagramtumblrflickrgoogle+, and youtube.





A Hat-trick of Sub-Twenty Temperatures for most of Antigua and Barbuda

22 01 2017

Dale C. S. Destin |

Last night’s cold weather makes it a hat-trick of sub-twenty temperatures for most of Antigua and Barbuda. This is a fairly rare feat for the country. It has only happened seven other times during January, based on historical data for the Airport. The last time it happened in January was back in 1996 – 20 years ago. The last time it happened for any month was in March 2000.jan2017temperatureWhereas the last hat-trick of sub-twenty temperatures occurred last in January 1996, the coolest such period last took place in 1992. It is also the coolest such period, for all months, last occurred in March 2000. This and the rest of what is said here is an update on the previous blog.

The mean minimum temperature for the past three nights, at the Airport, was 18.5 °C (65.3 °F). This is the eighth coldest for three or more days in a row with sub-twenty temperatures at the Airport. Further, it is the 12 coldest for any three-day sub-twenty spell (overlapping and otherwise).

When we consider such a three-peat of sub-twenty temperatures for all months dating back to 1971, it has only happened 27 previous times.

So far for January, the mean minimum temperature at the Airport of 22.0 °C (72 °F) is below normal. However, up to three days ago, it was bordering on above normal – meaning we were having relatively warm nights for this time of the year. The mean daily temperature is well below normal with a value of 24.7 °C (76.5 °F).

As cold as it has been, it certainly has NOT nearly been cold enough to freeze water. Thus, that picture being circulated suggesting that the cold weather caused a small body of water to freeze in Free Town is a HOAX. For this to happen, we would need to have sub-zero temperatures persisting for days, which will NEVER happen.

There have only being five occasions when sub-twenty degree nights have occurred for more than three consecutive nights. Tonight is likely to be the sixth time this has happened. So far, today has been coldest of the past three days.

After tonight, the weather will warmup to usual temperatures for this time of the year. Then the cold weather will more likely than not return on Wednesday and continue on Thursday. Thereafter, the usual temperatures for this time of the year is expected to prevail for the rest of the month.

Although we are unable to say definitively how cold the country or specific areas have been due scarcity of historical temperature data, it is likely the coldest since 1996. This is based on fact that temperatures across a small homogeneous area like Antigua and Barbuda are highly correlated. And since it is the coldest for the Airport since 1992, it should be likewise for the rest of the islands.

From a quantitative standpoint, the statements above are truest for the Airport and surrounding areas; however, from a qualitative assessment, it is applicable to the rest of the country.

Follow us for all you need to know about this mini-cold spell we are experiencing. We can be followed on twitterfacebookinstagramtumblrflickrgoogle+, and youtube for education and information on all things weather and climate.





How Cold was Antigua and Barbuda Last Night?

20 01 2017

Dale C. S. Destin |

By Caribbean standards, the last two nights were very cold for Antigua and Barbuda. One of the coldest spots on the islands was Free Town, which had a minimum temperature of 13.9 °C (57.0 °F) night before last and 11.6 °C (52.9 °F) last night.

picture2jan212017picturejan202017The 11.6 °C  is now the lowest temperature ever measured by the Met Office. It eclipsed the previous short-lived record of 13.9 °C. However, it is unlikely to be the lowest temperature ever experienced in Free Town or by the country. The lowest ever measured is not the same as the lowest on record or in history.

Unfortunately, apart from the Airport, there were NO reliable temperature sensors elsewhere across the country until a few years ago. There exists very little historical data for Free Town, as the station was only installed last January. The same is true for most of the other stations listed above. Thus, regrettably, I am unable to say definitively just how cold it was in Free Town and most of the other locations.

The only site for which historical data exist is the Airport. The minimum temperature measured at the Airport last night was 18.4 °C (65.1 °F); this is well above the record of 16.1 °C (61.0 °F), measured back in December 1974 and January 1976.

Making some reasonable assumptions and using the Airport’s temperature from last night as a “barometer” for the rest of the country, last night was the coldest January night since 1996 and the 12th coldest dating back to, at least, 1971.

Last night, the minimum temperature range for Antigua and Barbuda was 11.0 to 21.0 °C (52 to 69.8 °F) . The previous night it was 13.0 to 22.0 °C (55.4 to 72 °F). It is possible that a few areas had temperatures slightly below or above this range.

The cold weather last night was due to the time of the year, light winds, mostly clear skies and low moisture levels. Last night was colder than Thursday night mainly because moisture levels were lower. These conditions will continue for the next 24 hours; hence, tonight is expected to be similarly cold. Thereafter, the winds will increase and so will the temperature.

With the few cold nights, some have advanced the notion that we are having a colder than usual January. However, this is not borne out by the data at the Airport, thus far. The mean minimum temperature up to two days ago, at the Airport, for the month was 22.6 °C (72.7 °F), 0.2 °C above the average of 22.4 °C  (72.3 °F).

The cold weather was also experienced across most of the rest of the northeast Caribbean for the second night also. Le Raizet, Guadeloupe had a minimum of 17.6 °C (63.7 °F) night before last and 16.8 °C (62.2 °F) last night, meanwhile Clayton J. Lloyd International Airport in Anguilla had 19.4 °C (66.9 °F) and 20.2 °C (68.4 °F) respectively.

Will it be colder tonight, with some places having sub 10 °C (sub 50 °F)? Follow us via our social media platform:  twitter,  facebook,  instagramtumblrflickrgoogle+, and youtube and stay informed. We would also be happy to hear from you regarding how cold you felt and your experience with the weather generally.





Storm-Force Winds and Hurricane-Like Seas to Impact Antigua and Barbuda This Weekend

17 12 2016

Dale C. S. Destin |

Significant tightening of the pressure gradient across the area is expected to cause strong winds with frequent gusts to storm force strength or gale force. The seas will respond to the strong winds and become very rough.

Surface chart

Surface Chart for Sunday 8 am, Showing a Tight Pressure Gradient As Evident by the Closeness of the Isobars (pressure lines)

The winds – they will generally be in excess of 18 mph (16 kt) from late Saturday night to Monday afternoon. The winds will peak as high as 30 mph (26 kt) with frequent gusts between 38 and 46 mph (33 and 38 kt) Sunday morning to Monday morning.

High Sustained Winds

Sustained Winds

Wind Gusts

Wind Gusts

The seas –  they will respond to the winds and become very rough, rising to as high as 3.9 metres (13 ft) on Sunday night. Waves will rise above six feet by Saturday morning and remain above this height through midweek. Waves of 2.7 to 3.9 metres (9 to 13 ft) will prevail from Saturday night to Wednesday. Waves are expected to fall off rapidly after Wednesday.

Seas

Seas

The cause – as indicated above, it is the substantial tightening or steepening of the pressure gradient.  This is in response to a very strong surface high pressure system moving from west to east across the Atlantic from the United States.  This will NOT be due to any tropical cyclone (tropical depression, tropical storms or hurricane).

Fundamentally, wind blow as a result of pressure differential (pressure gradient). The greater the pressure between point A and point B (pressure gradient) the stronger the winds.

Where – the strong winds will mostly take place over open waters, exposed eastern coastal areas and elevated areas of Antigua and Barbuda. The seas will be roughest in the Atlantic coastal waters east of the islands, as the winds will be generally easterly. Similar conditions are expected across most of the rest of the Eastern Caribbean. However, Antigua and Barbuda could get the worst of it.

Precautions – The Antigua and Barbuda Meteorological Services have issued warnings for sea-bather and small craft operators. The former should avoid the beaches, especially those on the Atlantic or eastern side of the islands, and the latter should not venture far from port, at least, until Thursday.

A small craft warning generally means that wind speeds in excess of 16 knots is causing or expected to cause hazardous sea conditions to small craft within 24 hours. Inexperience mariners, especially those operating smaller vessels should avoid navigating these conditions.

According to the Beaufort Scale, gale-force winds run from 39 to 54 mph (34 to 47 kt). Operating a vessel in gale conditions requires special expertise and specially equipped vessels. It is highly recommended that mariners without the proper experience seek safe harbour prior to the onset of gale conditions.

The strong winds, especially if frequently gusting to gale force, could also make some outdoor activities very uncomfortable if not hazardous, please be guided accordingly.

We will be keeping a close eye on this developing situation and keep you informed via our social media platform: twitterfacebookinstagramtumblrflickrgoogle+, and youtube.





Potential Flooding Rainfall to End the Hurricane Season

28 11 2016

Dale C. S. Destin |

Satellite Image - Past 6 hrs Ending 11:45 UTC or 7:45 Local Time

Satellite Image – Past 6 hrs Ending 11:45 UTC or 7:45 Local Time

A surface low pressure system is expected to form near the northeast Caribbean and cause potential flooding rainfall across much of the Eastern Caribbean through Tuesday. Antigua and Barbuda is expected to see peak totals today – Monday.

The system could cause 25 to 100 mm (1-4 in) of rainfall, with locally higher amounts, from the Dominican Republic to Trinidad and Tobago. The epicentre of the rainfall is likely to be just south of Antigua or across the northern Windward Islands where the total could max-out above 100 mm (above 4 in).

North American  Mesoscale Forecast System (Model) Rainfall Accumulations - Nov 27-29, 2016

North American Mesoscale (NAM Model) Forecast System Rainfall Accumulations – Nov 27-29, 2016.

 

Globale Forecast System (GFS) Rainfall Accumulations for the Period Nov 27-29, 2016

Global Forecast System (GFS Model) Rainfall Accumulations for the Period Nov 27-29, 2016

With this type of rainfall, minor flooding is expected and moderate or worse flooding is possible. Hence, flash flood watches and warning may be required for a number of other areas over the next 12 to 36 hours.

This may be a fitting end to a very wet start to November. The month had a near record wet start across the Eastern Caribbean. In Antigua, some areas received upward 200 mm (8 in) during the first 10 days of the month. At the V. C. Bird International Airport, the rainfall stood at 143.5 mm (5.7 in) by November 10 – the third most on record dating back to 1928.

Rainfall Anomalies

Rainfall Anomalies for the Period Nov 1-10, 2016

With this type of rainfall, minor flooding is expected and moderate or worse flooding is possible. Hence, flash flood watches and warning may be required for a number of other areas over the next 12 to 36 hours.

This may be a fitting end to a very wet start to November. The month had a near record wet start across the Eastern Caribbean. In Antigua, some areas received upward 200 mm (8 in) during the first 10 days of the month. At the V. C. Bird International Airport, the rainfall stood at 143.5 mm (5.7 in) by November 10 – the third most on record dating back to 1928.

Recall also, that there were deadly floods and landslides across portions of St. Vincent during the early parts of the month.

The forecast rainfall for Monday is not a foregone conclusion but it is quite possible. If it were to materialized, this November would be one of the wettest on record for much of the Eastern Caribbean. In Antigua, it would be the wettest since Hurricane Lenny’s deluge of 1999 and be among the top 10 wettest Novembers of all time.

After the low, very cool northerly winds are expected to blow across the region. These will likely cause our coolest weather for the season and since February. Night-time temperatures could fall to below 19 °C (66 °F) Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday nights.

Follow us on our social media – twitterfacebookinstagramtumblrflickrgoogle+, and youtube, and be updated on the latest weather and climate news.





September 2016 to February 2017 Climate Outlooks for Antigua and Barbuda

29 09 2016

Dale C. S. Destin |

The September 2016 to February 2017 climate outlooks are now available for Antigua and Barbuda. Over the long-term (September-February), above to near normal rainfall is expected. However, in the short-term – September to November (SON), below to near normal rainfall is expected. The droughts are more likely than not to remain as is or end over the short-term. Meanwhile, uncomfortably warm temperatures are expected for the upcoming six months, especially during the short-term.

Drought

August 2016 is the wettest since 2011 and the wettest of any month since November 2014. It was a wetter than normal August with an island-average of 130.3 mm (5.13 in). Notwithstanding, it was not wet enough to end the droughts, which have gone past 38 months.

Looking forward – there is a moderate chance (55%) of the droughts either not getting worse or ending during the period SON. Conversely, there is also a moderate chance of the SON period having below normal rainfall. Notwithstanding, over the long run, above to near normal rainfall is expected. Thus, drought watches are in effect instead of warnings.

jun-nov2016_rainfall

The warm phase of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) – El Nino, came to an end in May. At which time, the chance of a cold phase i.e. La Nina was in excess of 75%. However, as of this month, the probability of La Nina is at 55% and declining.

If you are in our part of the world – the Caribbean, a La Nina would be more than welcome. Unlike El Nino, La Nina often brings us more than usual rainfall. Hence, given our severe water crisis of the past three years, to not have a La Nina as “promised” would be a great disappointment.

The rains over the past weeks have put a huge dent into the droughts. We are experiencing one of our wettest, if not wettest September in over 20 years. There is optimism that a few of the droughts have ended. More will be said on this, after a full assessment, by the middle of October.

Precipitation and temperature

Year-to-date, Antigua, on average, has had more than twice the amount of rainfall than for the same period last year. Notwithstanding, we are still over three inches in the “red” relative to the long-term average for January-August of 647.7 mm (25.50 in).

This up-tick in rainfall has a reasonable chance of continuing over the long-term: September 2016 to February 2017, there is an 80% probability of above to near normal rainfall. However, the projected rainfall for 2016 is 657 to 1218.5 mm (25.9-48.0 in) or below to near normal.

For the seasons SON (autumn) and DJF (winter), there are equal chances of below, near or above normal mean temperatures. However, over the long-term, mean temperatures are likely to be above normal. Higher than usual night-time low temperatures are likely to continue through November, resulting in continued uncomfortable warmer nights.

The hurricane season

We are passed the peak days of the hurricane season for us and for the season overall. However, we are still very much in the most active period of the hurricane season – August to October. Thus far, the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season has produced, 12 named storms, four hurricanes and one major hurricane.

The 12 named storms are 50% more than the average of 8 to date [September 25]. However, the accumulated energy (ACE) index which matters most, is less than 50% of the average of 106. The relatively low ACE is indicative of the fact that the storms have been generally weak.

The forecast is for a near normal season with around 15 named storms, 7 becoming hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes; this includes those already formed.

Notwithstanding the forecast, we need to be fully prepared, as it only takes one hurricane to set our life and community back by decades. Be prudent: prepare for the worst and hope for the best!

See the following links for the full outlooks: September 2016, September-November 2016, December 2016-February 2017September 2016-February 2017Drought, 2016 Updated Hurricane Season Forecast.

The next set of outlooks will be available by October 5, 2016.





Antigua and Barbuda Battered by Torrential Rains

16 09 2016

Last week Monday, Antigua and Barbuda was battered by torrential rains from a tropical disturbance. This resulted in major flooding in many parts of the country, especially in low-lying and flood-prone areas. We had not seen such downpours in nearly a decade.

Satellte loop of the tropical disturbance

Satellite loop of the tropical disturbance

Many parts of Antigua got more than the average total rainfall for September in less than 24 hours. On average, Antigua got around 139.7 mm (5.5 in) in less than 24 hours, with many areas getting over 180 mm (over 7 in), which is much more than the island-average of 144.0 mm (5.67 in) for September.

RadarRainfallAccumulation-24hrs ending 2amSep62016

Radar rainfall accumulations for the 24 hrs ending 2 a.m. Sep 6, 2016

With the average rainfall total of 139.7 falling on 108 square miles (the size of Antigua), it means that about 8.6 billion imperial gallons (IG) of water fell on Antigua between 2 am, September 5 and 2 am September 6. As a reference, this amount of water could serve the country for three years. It’s also close to 100 times the 90 million IG collected by Potworks Dam.

Clearly, with all this water, it should come as no surprise the we had areas with major flooding. Notwithstanding the negative impacts of the flooding, it was rainfall to make most Antiguans and Barbudans, particularly water resources managers and farmers, smile from ear to ear. It resulted in significant recharging of catchments, many of which were dry or below extraction levels since early last year.

Potworks Dam: left – Aug 24, 2016, right – Sep 6, 2016

Potworks Dam, which was dry for over a year, was filled to around one-eighth, according to the Antigua Public Utilities Authority – APUA (the water authority) . It collected around 90 million IG of water, enough to augment water supplies for the next three to four months. APUA has since indicated an easing of water rationing, at least, for the short-term.

Monday September 5, 2016 was the wettest day for quite a while for many areas of Antigua. At the Airport it was the wettest day since Hurricane Earl’s unwelcome visit in 2010. It was also one of the wettest days since Hurricane Lenny in 1999. Only three other days have been wetter since Lenny – the “father” of all flooding for Antigua.

Although this type of rainfall has been rare for the past 15 years, it does occur fairly frequently at a rate of around once every four to five years, based on rainfall measured at the V. C. Bird International Airport – the home of the Antigua and Barbuda Meteorological Service. In other words, it has about a 20-25% chance of happening each year.

The rains caused major flooding of low-lying and flood-prone areas. This resulted in an unknown number of cars being stalled in flood waters and a number of homes came very close to being flooded. There were minor rock slides reported but damage, if any, is unknown. In the wake of the event, many roads were damage due to erosion.

Flooded road

Flooded road

Flooded road

Flooded yard

The event proved very challenging to forecast. Several days before the event, most models forecast up to five inches of rainfall to occur. However, as we got closer to September 5, the models shifted the rainfall to the south of Antigua. Up to the morning of the event, none of the models surveyed came remotely close to forecast the rainfall that eventually occurred.  

Can we get a repeat of last week Monday?  It is probable but highly unlikely. The chance of getting two such days in a given year is around seven percent. So whereas getting dowsed by such drenching rainfall is not unusual, especially at this time of the year, it is highly unusual for it to happen twice in a year.

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